Dianne G. Sagan – Best Selling Author

Christian and Women's fiction, with a little mystery thrown in for good measure


1 Comment

Z is for Zealotry

Roman Soldiers At EasterIn the first century the Zealots were those who fought outwardly against Rome. They tried to start revolutions to overthrow their oppressors, and the usual result was that they were crushed and the survivors crucified. About the time Jesus was a boy the Zealots staged an uprising, and the history resources I’ve used say the roads entering Jerusalem were lined with hundreds of crosses bearing the rebellious contenders as a warning for the people to go home and submit to Roman rule.

And it wasn’t just that the Romans ruled over them. Rome taxed them and even demanded that Roman subjects bow down to the image of the Emperor. Among the Jews, bowing down to anyone but Yahweh, the One True God, was forbidden by the Mosaic Law, and in bowing to a mere man a Jew could be put to death. However, if they did not bow down to Caesar then the Roman governor of Palestine could have them crucified. This was undoubtedly the origin of the dilemma, “damned if you do, damned if you don’t.”

The High Priest tried to reason with the Roman officials but with little success. The Zealots incited riots, killed Roman soldiers caught alone in the streets of Jerusalem, or attacked small cohorts of soldiers marching across the countryside. Palestine was considered the most rebellious province in the Empire by many officials in Rome and the worst place to be stationed by most legionnaires. Why?  Because of the Zealots and their One God for whom they would so readily die.

This is the turmoil that is the backdrop of my stories, and it provides a constant, visceral tension on top of everything else that happens to my characters. It is into this world that Jesus was born.

I’d like you to consider another side of zeal for a moment. This is the side that Jesus had and that his dreamstimefree_27664970disciples shared. It’s constructive, not destructive. It’s what Rebekah, Johanna, Miriam and Mary all found after their encounters with Jesus. The dictionary defines zeal as great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objective. It is a passion, a devotion, often for only an idea.

In those private moments after each woman meets with Jesus she is changed forever in the way she thinks and in the way she acts. She finds a new sense of purpose for her life and a new zest for living it. She is filled with both joy and passion.

My own path in this life has been an answer to the “Jesus question”: What greater cause is there than love for and service to your fellow man?

Thank you for joining me on my journey. I hope I have helped you answer this question for yourself, and I hope you live the rest of your life with zeal.


Leave a comment

Y is for Yahweh

Intense LightningLet me start with a little historical background. If you were to step back in time and travel across the Roman Empire in the first century then you would find an empire that ruled over many cultures. Even though most Jews lived in Palestine, some Jewish settlements were scattered around the the Mediterranean from the time the Assyrians conquered the Northern Kingdom of Israel about 722 B.C. Four hundred years later Alexander the Great would rule much of the eastern empire and spread a Hellenistic culture that would last well into the first century of the common era. The Greek influence in architecture throughout the Roman Empire can still be seen in ruins across Europe and the Mediterranean regions as well as Turkey, the Middle East and North Africa. Judea was not dispersed permanently until 70 A.D. when the Romans destroyed Jerusalem and the Herodian Temple.

Across the Roman  Empire the people – both Romans and many of those the Romans had conquered – worshiped multiple gods, but the Jews persisted in claiming one God who was so sacred to them that they did not even use his actual name. The cultures around the ancient Jews even erected monuments to “the god with no name.” You may remember in the story of Moses and the burning bush he asked God what he should call Him. God replied, “I am that I am.” Let’s face it: this is, at best, ambiguous, and religious scholars have been arguing for centuries about just what it means.

“I am that I am” is a little cumbersome as a reference to or a name for God, and in Judaism they developed some alternatives that were easier to apply and still observe the prohibition of calling God by name. One is Yahweh. If you go to a synagogue today you find Him called Hashem. There are others, but you get the idea.

When Jesus came he spoke about “God our father,” and the Jewish religious officials said it was blasphemy because the carpenter’s son spoke in such familiarity and his words made Jesus “God.” Such an utterance would have been considered a grave offense then, and even today it might get the speaker commited to an asylum.

The message that Jesus brought gave the people a God who was approachable, not a God who only stayed in the Holy of Holies in the Temple in Jerusalem, jealous, angry and terrifying. Jesus even called Him “Abba,” which roughly translates to “daddy.”

In Jewish tradition God is hard, demanding and vengeful. But the way I see God – through Jesus – He is compassionate and loving, and he beckons his children to come to Him. He wants us to return to Him so that He may heal our bodies and our hearts. He does have expectations that we will treat each other with love and that we will be of service to one another, and I believe we are accountable to God for our actions, someday and somehow.

But the enduring lesson of Jesus was the message that when we fall short of God’s expectations the result is not anger but forgiveness.

That is how I try to present Him in the Women of the Bible series.


3 Comments

X is for Xerxes

Jerusalem PalmWhat does the Babylonian King Xerxes, husband of Esther, have to do with first-century historical novellas?

The kings, or wise men, who visited Mary, Joseph, and the baby Jesus were from the East. Resources say that at least one of them was from Babylon. If you remember the story of Esther then you know that she saved the Jewish remnant of her people who remained in Babylon after some of them had been allowed to return to Palestine during Darius’ reign.

Another connection with Judaism is that the Jewish scribes in Babylon wrote down the Torah for the first time. Prior to that time, Torah was passed down from generation to generation by word of mouth. The priests had taught the young boys by repetition, word for word, until they could recite the entire Torah from memory. In Jesus’ day the priests and rabbis read from Torah scrolls which were probably copied from those same original written works from Babylon.

Centuries later the Torah would  become the first five books of the Old Testament in the Christian Bible. The  stories in its content are as familiar today as they were to the first-century Jewish society that I write about in my books. They are a foundation for the research of the social and religious make-up of the people in my Women of the Bible series.

Without the development of the written Torah in Babylon and the tolerance of Xerxes for Esther’s people, we can only speculate about how long it might have taken for a written version to inform the works of those who wrote the Christian bible.

It is an over-simplification, in my opinion, to treat the Christian Bible as a work separate from the Torah. The Christian Bible continues a story that the Torah began.


Leave a comment

W is for Worry

Holy MultiplicationWorrying is a familiar pastime for most of us today and has been shared over the centuries by men and women alike. In my Women of the Bible series I incorporated this common human characteristic into each of the women. After she becomes a slave Rebekah worries that she will spend her whole life in bondage. Johanna worries that with the miscarriage of their child her husband, Simon Peter, will divorce her for being barren. Miriam worries that she cannot be both mother and father to her son, John Mark, after the death of her husband, Ezra. Mary worries for the safety of her son, Jesus, when they escape to Egypt.

Each woman, like us, worries and focuses on the events in front of her, not able to see beyond the present challenge. She broods about it. She only speaks about her heartache if those around her force the issue. Her worries become fears that control her thoughts and behavior until she finally encounters Jesus.

These meetings turn into what psychologists call “pattern interrupts” for each of them. He listens to them, seeking out and examining what concerns are driving each one in her own direction. When he speaks to them his words and his attitude of loving acceptance for all that is grant each one a perspective of timelessness. In the process they each surrender the quality of worry for some other quality that produces both inner peace and altered actions. Even Mary feels this from the young Jesus when she needs it the most.

In the four gospels, we read about Jesus’ life. They each tell us that when Jesus felt tired, when he was at a low ebb, when he worried about the future he faced, he prayed.

Each of my stories is an example of this transformative power of prayer. Our prayers may not remove the source of our worries, but they can, should and often do “reframe” that which we worry about to permit answers that may have eluded us before.


Leave a comment

V is for Vanity

Vanity is generally defined as excessive pride in one’s appearance, achievements and qualities. As such, it can be viewed as an expression of one’s ego, that part of us that yearns to assert our uniqueness and our valu-Vanity - dog in the mirrore. Vanity might be considered as the triumph of image over substance. In Catholicism vanity is one of the Seven Deadly Sins, a quality so destructive as to condemn us to damnation unless we overcome it.

I chose to make vanity an essential characteristic of various characters in my “Women of the Bible” series. For example, in Rebekah Redeemed Rebekah’s aunt Mara, with whom Rebekah went to live, thought only of herself and her own needs and wants. In Mary’s Exile, Herod is known throughout his kingdom for his paranoid compulsion to eliminate any who would deprive him of his power or glory. History tells us that he was so focused on himself and his position that he ordered his own wife and son killed to protect his throne.

By using characters who are pictures of vanity in my stories I can show the great contrast between that kind of thinking and behavior and what Jesus reflected. He enters each story through what characters say about him when they hear him teach, and when my main characters meet him they have a universal experience of someone of divine carriage and poise. Through this I can begin to reveal his character as I see it. As each story unfolds I can then demonstrate Jesus’ impact through the subsequent behavior of and consequences to my main characters.

The message in every one of these stories is similar: That we are all bound to each other, that we are all accountable to God for what we do in spite of the forces we believe are “making us” do it, that life lived in service to others is the most reliable and enjoyable way of defeating vanity with spirit.

If my stories touch my readers this way then I am content.


Leave a comment

U is for Unusual

bigstock_Fisherman_240621When I started writing my Women of the Bible series, it was unusual to find books about little-known women mentioned in the Bible. (I guess that’s why they were “little-known.”) The idea for The Fisherman’s Wife came from the gospels of  Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Each one mentions in one verse that Jesus went to Simon Peter’s house and that Simon’s mother-in-law was ill. Jesus healed her and she served them. Like many other people, I read this story for years before realizing the clear implication: Simon Peter had a wife.

I immediately realized that I knew nothing about her, not even her name. Nor could I find anything Roman roaddefinitive anywhere about who she was, where she came from or what her life was like. From studying Catholic sources of church history I found out only three things: that she and Simon Peter had a daughter, that she often accompanied Simon Peter when he travelled, and that she was crucified with her husband in Rome.

So I started by I asking myself these questions:

– Given how and where Simon Peter grew up, where was his wife most likely from?

– Knowing what I do about Peter from what I read in the scriptures and in other sources, what might it have been like to be married to a man like him?

– What kind of life events might most likely cause chronic and heartbreaking stress for a first-century Jewish woman and her husband?

– What would it feel like to have an unknown rabbi come to my village and take my husband away with him  and leaving us to fend for ourselves?

– What would I think when this rabbi unexpectedly came back with my husband, my brother-in-law and a dozen or so of their close friends and wanted to stay with us?

– What would I do when hundreds of people crowded inside and around our house trying to see Jesus and refused to leave?

– What might this rabbi do to convince me that he was the prophesied Messiah?

– What would I say when I met Jesus face to face?

– How would I come to terms with this new rabbi and his teachings?

I soon saw that there were a number of ways to answer these questions. Some were so “usual” as to be trite, even hackneyed, and those answers, I knew, would not tell the story that I felt squirming around in my head.

So I took a chance. I reached for something “UN-usual.”

The squirming stopped.


Leave a comment

T is for Transcendence

first century homeI chose the subjects and circumstances for these stories to make them examples of transcendence. I illustrated this transcendence in two ways. The first was  transcendence in time – the sequence of act and consequence that defines the path of the story. The second was the transcendence in Jesus’ relationship with the women he encountered. Rebekah, Johanna, Miriam and Mary are all faced with challenges in their lives that they experience as too overwhelming to handle by themselves. There may be other characters in the stories trying to comfort and support them, but they each feel deserted, defeated and alone. Even when they cry out to Yahweh, His lack of immediate relief for their distress feels to them as if He doesn’t hear them.

It is when they cannot understand what to do next that Jesus comes to them. In each case he first listensLet the Children Come to MeCarl Vogel von Vogelstein, 1805 to them. He empathizes with their emotional stresses. He accepts their descriptions of their circumstances. He responds with compassion, with clarity, and with a point of view different from the one they each seized upon. He gives each one exactly what is necessary in the deepest part of her soul to continue with courage, strength and gentle joy.

To transcend anything is, for me, to rise above it, to climb to some higher vantage point that allows a person to see what was hidden from the lower vantage point of life’s daily travail.

The story is told of a small party of adventurers hacking their way through a dense jungle. Tired, hungry and blistered they come to a clearing. As they rest they hear a helicopter approach. It lands, and one of the party climbs aboard. When the helicopter rises the adventurer can see many things: hills, streams, villages and, in the distance, the mountain that he knows intuitively is their goal. He also sees, about one hundred yards from the trail they had been hacking and running parallel to it, an asphalt road. When the helicopter lands again, the adventurer takes his party, turns ninety degrees, and hacks the short distance to the roadway.

This, to me, is transcendence.